LO-ACT project ouputs

LO-ACT is looking at the 'ordinary actions' taken by citizens to improve everyday life 

whilst tackling climate change.

We will use this page to showcase outputs linked to the project. 

 

1. Urban Sustainability and Justice

Urban Sustainability and Justice

'Urban Sustainability and Justice presents an innovative yet practical approach to incorporate equity and social justice into sustainable development in urban areas, in line with the commitments of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals and the New Urban Agenda. This work proposes a feminist reading of just sustainabilities' principles to reclaim sustainability as a progressive discourse which informs action on the ground. This work will help the committed activist (whether they are on the ground, working in a community, in a non-governmental organization (NGO), in a business, at a university, in any sphere in government) to connect their work to international efforts to deliver environmental justice in cities around the world.

Drawing on a comparative, international analysis of sustainability initiatives in over 200 cities, Castán Broto and Westman find limited evidence of the implementation of just sustainabilities principles in practice, but they argue that there is considerable potential to develop a justice-oriented sustainability agenda. Highlighting current successes while also assessing prospects for the future, the authors show that just sustainabilities is not merely an aspirational discourse, but a frame of reference to support radical action on the ground.'

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2. Two Waves of Research on

Urban Climate Governance

 

Ten years after Copenhagen:

Reimagining climate change governance in urban areas

As part of the project work programme, LO-ACT team conducted a literature review of 383 articles that present social sciences analyses of climate change action in urban areas.

This highlighted two moments of acceleration.

10 years after copenhagen - 2 waves.png
Key debates within the two waves of rese

Abstract

'In this review, we take stock of the last decade of research on climate change governance in urban areas since the 2009 conference in Copenhagen. Using a systematic evaluation of academic publications in the field, we argue that the current moment of research has been shaped by two recent waves of thought. The first, a wave of urban optimism, which started in 2011 and peaked in 2013, engaged with urban areas as alternative sites for governance in the face of the crumbling international climate regime. The second, a wave of urban pragmatism, which started in 2016, has sought to reimagine urban areas following the integration of the “sub‐national” as a meaningful category in the international climate regime after the 2015 Paris Agreement for Climate Action. Four themes dominate the debate on climate change governance in urban areas: why there is climate action, how climate action is delivered, how it is articulated in relation to internationally reaching networks, and what implications it has to understand environmental or climate justice within urban settings. Calls to understand the impacts of climate change policy have fostered research on climate change politics, issues of power and control, conflicts, and the inherently unjust nature of much climate policy. What is largely missing from the current scholarship is a sober assessment of the mundane aspects of climate change governance on the ground and a concern with what kind of cultural and socio‐economic change is taking place, beyond comparative analyses of the effectiveness of climate policies.'

10 years after copenhagen - research met

This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme

Grant Agreement No 804051 — LO-ACT — ERC-2018-STG

 

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